I have a small closet – and a husband to share it with. After months of struggling to find clothes amongst the clutter, I’ve decided to start a capsule wardrobe. There are lots of reasons to start a capsule wardrobe, including the ease of locating items in a small closet and the amount of time it takes to choose an outfit (hint: it’s a lot less!), but I’ve got unique reasons for starting mine. Keep reading to discover the three reasons I’ve started a capsule wardrobe.

 

I’ve obviously chosen to begin a capsule wardrobe because my closet is so small (and it is less stressful to choose an outfit, because there are far less options) but the biggest reason I started a capsule wardrobe was because I use Rent the Runway Unlimited. Rent the Runway Unlimited is a unlimited (duh!) subscription service in which I rent designer clothes.

How does it work?

I can choose four items at a time, keep them for as long as I’d like, and then send them back.

What’s with the unlimited part?

After I send back my first four items, I can choose another four. I can have multiple packages sent to me each month.

What is the purpose of renting clothes?

Well, a lot of these clothes are from designers like Tory Burch, Red Valentino, and The Kooples. I don’t choose to spend money on designer purchases, as I prefer to spend it on travel or experiences.

So what does this have to do with a capsule wardrobe?

I’m able to keep that ever-rotating wardrobe vibe that a lot of bloggers have, while keeping the capsule wardrobe that I’m loving. It makes it easier for me to live and be a blogger. I get things that I can shoot (I mean, I need some awesome ootd insta shots, don’t I?) while testing out different designers. I’ve chosen clothes from brands that I knew I love, like Free People, Red Valentino, and Milly; and, I’ve learned about new designers, like The Kooples, BA&SH, and Cinq à Sept.

The second reason I’m starting a capsule wardrobe has to do with my lack of understanding when it comes to my personal style. In other words, I don’t know what my personal style is. One minute, I’m wearing a grunge tee with ripped denim and the next I’m wearing a blush, floral dress. I’m both classic and boho, feminine and casual.

Narrowing down my wardrobe, ensuring to stick to a color palette and clothes that can easily mix and match, has been a personal challenge. I’m still building the wardrobe to what I want it to be, as I donated a TON of stuff, but being cognizant of what I’m purchasing is so new to me. Before I’d put something on and I’d get it or I wouldn’t. It made things tough, having a closet full of things that didn’t really go together. Having this smaller wardrobe doesn’t feel like I’m restricting myself, though. It feels like I’m finally defining who I am.

So what’s the third reason, then?

The third reason I decided to start a capsule wardrobe is the reason a lot of people do a lot of things: money. I love fashion. I love wearing different kinds of clothing. Being fashionable makes me feel good, makes me feel beautiful.

I love hair and makeup too but am, by far, no expert in either of these things. I can do three things with my hair: wear it straight, curl it, or pull it in a pony. When it comes to makeup, I’m at about the same level.

But fashion, now that, I’m good at (well, I think I am). However, when I was younger, I chose to spend a bit of my income on clothes. Now that I’m older, I appreciate experiences and travel far more, and choose to save my money so that I can travel.

Is this really a capsule wardrobe?

In the grand scheme of things, this probably isn’t an actual capsule wardrobe. But for a woman that had a ton of random pieces (even if she loved them all!) this is a capsule wardrobe. There’s space between the hangers (and there are just two racks for me to hang clothes on.

I don’t follow a strict capsule set of rules. But I do think that, for those that can’t follow those rules (e.g. 33 items, shoes and accessories are included) my kind of capsule is perfect.

Wanna help me out?

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